SCBWI Canada East Blog

June 17, 2013

12:04 PM 7
Special thanks this week's participants, Alma and Heather - for taking on the second round of the SCBWI Author/Illustrator MASH UP. Both (incredible) creators were given the following (random) attributes:

Name: Brascoe
Species: T-Rex
Occupation: News Anchor
Location: Tree House
They had no contact with each other (nor did they know who they were paired with) and had ONE-WEEK to complete the story or illustration...

©2013 Alma Fullerton

Brascoe and the Time Machine

By Heather Wright

It was Brascoe’s turn to take the time machine home for the weekend. Looking like an old-fashioned ATV welded to a large metal sheet, it floated to a silent stop behind Brascoe’s house.
Brascoe’s dad opened the back door.  He was the local morning news anchor, so he was home before Brascoe finished school.  He smiled. When Brascoe brought the time machine home, he sometimes got an interesting story for his broadcast.
“This contraption’s looking pretty battered,” he said, walking around the machine. He peered at the safety inspection label. “Hmmm. Three months ago.”
Brascoe wasn’t listening. He was thinking about the five minutes of time travel he’d earned. Tomorrow he’d be in Big Muddy and see cowboys from three hundred years ago.
 “Why don’t you start her up? I’d like to hear how she’s running,” said his dad. He patted his tool belt. “Then you can help me finish the tree house before dinner arrives.”
Brascoe hopped on the machine. “Stand back, Dad.” The first thing the machine did was make a huge bubble that surrounded it like a silver helium balloon. While the machine was in the past, it was invisible, and the bubble kept past and present from meeting each other.  
Brascoe said, “Ignition.” Nothing. He pushed the ignition button. Nothing. He pushed again. The machine hummed and the bubble grew. With a shudder, the bubble cracked like a broken mirror, and then immediately went smooth again. Brascoe heard his dad say, “I’ve never seen it do that before.” Then Brascoe heard nothing but the whoosh-swish of time travel.
He hadn’t touched a thing. He was positive. But he was flying through time anyway. He looked at the time control panel, and his stomach hit his throat. Bright yellow letters spelled CRETACEOUS.
The machine hit the ground with a jarring thud. When the bubble cleared, Brascoe saw a dozen grazing Albertadromeus in a large grassy clearing surrounded by giant ferns and trees.  The ground shook. They looked right through the time machine and ran. Brascoe turned and saw a howling T-Rex heading straight for him.
Brascoe reset the time control, yelled and then hit the ignition. Nothing. He hit it again. Nothing.  He banged his shaking hands on anything he could find on the control panel. Nothing. The bubble started to shatter, and Brascoe screamed, “No!”  He flung himself onto the metal sheet, curled up in a ball, and shut his eyes.
Whoosh-swish. The machine shifted. Shaking, Brascoe crawled back onto the seat and used his shirt sleeve to wipe the sweat off his face.
With a final clunk and shudder, the machine stopped. Brascoe switched it off, the bubble faded, and his dad was standing just where he’d left him. Brascoe jumped off the machine and hugged him.
“What happened?” His dad said, ruffling Brascoe’s hair. “You weren’t gone more than two minutes. Any chance of a good story?”
Brascoe grinned. “I’ll tell you all about it while we finish the tree house. Then you can tell me.”
 ©2013 Heather Wright

About the Author


Heather Wright loves writing for children and teens, and presenting creative writing workshops for writers of all ages. She is a big fan of mystery novels and really enjoyed writing Sherlock Holmes and the Orphanage Mystery, which was recently published by the JLS Storybook Project. She loves doing research, too, and has had a lot of fun writing many short stories for Kayak: Canada's history magazine for kids. Recently she received her second Ontario Arts Council Writers' Reserve grant for an anthology for young readers that she is co-writing.

If you know a teen who loves to write, Heather has also published Writing Fiction: A Hands-On Guide for Teens. If you love to write but are stuck for story ideas, check out 201 Writing Prompts, which Heather published in 2013.

Heather is also a freelance writer who writes for business and non-profits. Her work has been published on the web and by local, Canadian, and US publications.


http://wrightingwords.wordpress.com.  
https://wrightwriter.com

About the Illustrator

 
Alma Fullerton’s free-verse novels for juvenile and young adult readers have earned her multiple nominations and awards. Libertad was nominated for the Governor General’s Award; won the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award and the CLA Book of the Year Honour; and appeared on the Bank Street Books Best Children’s Books list. Another novel, Burn was a finalist for the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award and the CLA Book of the Year Award. Alma lives in Midland, Ontario. 

almafullerton.com

7 comments:

  1. What a super story and illustration, Heather and Alma. I'm amazed you both did that in one week. Great job!

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  2. FAN-tastic job you two!!! I loved the suspense Heather, as the T-Rex gets closer and closer to the stalled time machine! Alma, your mixed media rocks and your "Anchor" Brascoe has a most marvellous pipe cleaner microphone (his co-anchor doesn't look all that happy about sharing the news desk though:)

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  3. FAN-tastic job you two!!! I loved the suspense Heather, as the T-Rex gets closer and closer to the stalled time machine! Alma, your mixed media rocks and your "Anchor" Brascoe has a most marvellous pipe cleaner microphone (his co-anchor doesn't look all that happy about sharing the news desk though:)

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  4. A challenging set of attributes and a great result! Nice job Alma and Heather!

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  5. Ditto, great story and art! They go together very well and, like the first one, I want to read more.

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  6. Love this! Great job, Alma and Heather!

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